Public transport

Public transport in Málaga is well organized. City buses run to various neighborhoods in Málaga and regional buses, subway and train to places along the Costa del Sol and the interior of Andalusia.

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Rent a car

At Malaga airport there is a very wide choice of car rental companies and available cars.

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Malaga Airport

The Malaga airport is quite small, and you won’t need a lot of time to get through customs or to go to your gate. There is a subway station located directly at the airport.

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Common questions about malaga

Malaga is located in the South of Spain. Malaga’s location on the map is on the south coast of the Mediterranean. Also known as Costa del Sol. It is part of the beautiful region of Andalusia.

The climate is Mediterranean, with mild, relatively rainy winters and hot, sunny summers. Summers 25 – 35 degrees and in Wintertime between 20 – 16 gedrees.

Depending on what you are really looking for the best time to visit Malaga is from mid May til end October for a real lively vibe summer vacation. From November till April Malaga is still great to visit but everything is a bit calmer but the weather is still with very mild temperatures. January – February are the month with the most rain lately.

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History of Málaga

Malaga is one of the oldest cities in the world with close to three thousand years of history.
The Phoenicians first colonized the city of Malaga in 1000 B.C. and named it Malaka. The name of the city probably came from the Phoenician word ‘Malac’ which means ‘to salt’. The Pheonicians settled along the Guadalhorce River, which was the fish-salting centre. Slowly, Malaga became an important commercial centre, as it was rich in metals like silver and copper. The Greeks also came in and settled into an area called Mainake (6th century).

The Greek rule ended around 550 B.C. when the Carthaginians attacked and took control of Malaga. This forced the Phoenicians to also abandon their settlements as the Carthaginians took control of the commercial industry.

The Romans attacked Malaga and other parts of Spain around 218BC, which drove out the Carthaginians.
When the Romans started ruling Malaga, they included it under Hispania Ulterior of Roman Empire. Under the Romans, Malaga witnessed a cultural and economic revolution as the Roman theatre and the port of Malaga was constructed. During this time Malaga was named a confederate city of Rome under the Emperor Tito’s rule, which further multiplied its importance among other Spanish cities. During the Roman rule, Malaga was amongst the few cities, which had adapted well to Roman lifestyle and where Christianity majorly became present. After the Roman Empire fell at the beginning of the 5th century, the Visigoths tribes attacked Malaga. Subsequently, when the last of Romans left Malaga, they took full control of the whole town.

The Visigoths could not dominate Malaga for a long time and finally had to leave when the Moors attacked in 711. The Moors ruled Malaga for a long time and called Spain Al-Andalus. They left behind interesting historical structures, festivals and cultural activities.
Initially, the Moors concentrated on guarding Malaga from other foreign invaders along with expanding their territorial boundaries. It exported to the whole Meditteranean and to the seaport of the Arabian Kingdom of Grenada. Abd Al Ariz played a major role in the expansion of the town. Malaga became a significant Moorish city, famous for its figs and wine. It was one of the last Moorish cities to fall to the Christian conquerors when they attacked it in August 1487, with the help of small Christian clans within the town.

During the Christian rule the Muslims faced a lot of problems with them being sold as slaves or being killed. Malaga was transformed into a Christian town with the construction of churches and other structures, while the Moorish structures were destroyed. The only exceptions were the forts of Alcazaba and Gibralfaro. The conquerors of Christianity were Isabella and Ferdinand.
The 17th and 18th centuries were the worst periods for Malaga, with epidemics, floods, and earthquakes ruining the city. The situation improved during the 19th century and the town walls built by the Moors were demolished for expansion of the town. Malaga became a rich city and an important tourist centre. Structures like Theatre Cervantes (1866), Calle Marqus de Larios y la Alameda (1891) were built during this period. Though, the century ended on a bad note with economic crisis, new plagues and inundation.

Economic crisis continued even during the start of the 20th century and the agricultural sector suffered the most due to natural disasters. Political instability dominated this era due to the Spanish Civil War. But during General Franco’s rule, Malaga started regaining its position as an important commercial centre.
It was not till the 1960’s that Malaga became famous as an important tourist centre with hotels and resorts sprouting all over the city. The Costa del Sol was one of the most important regions responsible for boosting the city’s economy. Malaga has undergone significant transport infrastructure since the 1900’s to improve its roads and motorway connections to other neighbouring cities. Today Malaga is an important commercial centre and boasts of being Spain’s second largest port and its third largest international airport. It is also an important business centre with a number of international conventions held throughout the year.
The city has a population of close to 570,000 in 2012, making Malaga is the second most populated city within Andalucia and the sixth largest in Spain. Malaga enjoys the warmest winters in Europe, with average temperatures of 17.2C during the months of December to February. Its southerly location, the strong maritime influence from the Mediterranean and the protection offered by the Montes de Malaga, which act as a barrier against weather systems from the north, all combine to give Malaga a fantastic year round climate.

Get around in Malaga

Renting a car in Malaga can be quite cheap. However, sometimes in the high season prices can rise a lot.

If you would like to rent a car during your stay in Malaga, it is best to pick one up right away when you land at the airport. This way you also save money on a taxi, or public transport from the airport to the apartment.

The website with the cheapest car rentals is:
www.rentalcars.com

This is a website that contains all the different vendors that rent out cars from the airport. Fill out that you would like to pick it up, and return it at Malaga airport, AGP, and select the car that you like. If you would like to fully insure your car, do not do this through the website, but do this directly at the counter when you pick up your rental car. You will avoid paying a double insurance that way.

The Malaga airport is quite small, and you won’t need a lot of time to get through customs or to go to your gate. For flights within Europe, 1,5 hours ahead is more than enough time to get to your gate.

There is a subway station located directly at the airport. When you arrive in the arrivals hall, you walk out of the building and keep left. You follow the signs for the subway, and you cross the road until you find the entrance of the subway station.

You take the subway to the stop: Malaga Centro Alameda. This is the last stop of this train, so it won’t run further. From this station, it takes you 15 minute by foot to arrive at the apartment.

The historic center of Málaga is car-free, but around this center there are enough possibilities to park the car. The (underground) car parks are often within walking distance of the center and are monitored.

It is difficult to park for free and safely close to the center of Málaga. Outside the city, at the large (outlet) shopping center Plaza Mayor, you can park easily and for free.

Parkings

  • Central/ Marina – Plaza de la Marina
  • Camas – Calle Camas
  • Alcazaba – Plaza de la Alcazaba
  • Cervantes – Calle Cervantes
  • Tejón y Rodríguez – Calle Tejón y Rod
  • Harbour Muelle Uno